Unintended Consequences?

I’m always amazed at how people don’t seem to be able to think things through.

Los Angeles (CNN)In drought-punished Southern California, with the unceremonious push of a steely sodbuster, another lawn bites the dust.

That’s one down, and a sprawl to go.

Here in the land of perpetual sunshine, up to 5,000 residential lawns now vanish each month, converted into drought-resistant gardens and yards in under cash incentives, says the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD), a consortium of water utilities serving 17 million people.

It’s all part of“the nation’s largest turf removal and water conservation program”whose budget was more than quadrupled in May, to $450 million, because of a homeowner rush to save water, the district says.

Yeah, let’s put the focus on the homeowner’s rush to save water and not the MWD’s drive to save their business.  The article indicates that the program will “save more than 70 million gallons of water over 10 years — enough water for 160,000 households” — but are they considering the impact such actions will have?

Climate is controlled at ground level by turfgrasses as they cool temperatures appreciably, thus working as exterior “air conditioners.”  

Dust and smoke particles from the atmosphere are trapped by turf which helps keep the air cleaner.

Noise is absorbed by grass areas which cut down on excessive sound, a growing problem in urban areas.

For example, grassed slopes beside lowered expressways reduce noise 8-10 decibels.

Pollutants, such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide, are absorbed by turfgrasses thereby rendering the air fit to breathe. 

So instead of having CO2 sinks in our cities; we are going to increase the urban heat effect, increase the amount of pollution and dust in the area and increase the noise level. Gee, won’t it be such fun living in those areas?

 

 

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