A Post Delayed –

is just a post delayed. Today’s free ice cream has been rescheduled due to previous activities (actually sleeping in if you can believe that) and future plans (teaching a couple of new shooters).

Hopefully caffeine and activity will rouse the muse for a later post.

 

 

Government Competency?

Yeah, that is the reason why I want to trust my life only to the government by letting them have the only firearms (besides the criminals) – the government always gets things right……

PLANO — News 8 has learned that a federal grand jury in the Eastern District of Texas illegally charged 109 people in 2011 and 2013. The jury stayed in session because of a bureaucratic error after its term had expired.

Federal grand juries evaluate evidence presented to them by prosecutors and decide whether to issue criminal charges against suspects. The juries — which operate in secret — consist of 23 people, selected from the general population. Each jury is empaneled for 18 or 24 months.

The Plano grand juries passed the 24-month mark and continued to indict into their 25th month, nullifying charges made during that month.

“We concede that we’ve made a mistake,” Bales told News 8.

Although there are several grand juries in the sprawling Eastern District, only the Plano panels exceeded their 24-month limit.

Not one grand jury panel but two in a row went past their allotted time. And the people enforcing the law set such great examples, don’t they?

PLANO — A Plano police officer who was arrested Wednesday morning now faces charges of driving while intoxicated and evading police.

Byron Betler, a 10-year veteran of the department, had crashed his vehicle near the corner of Hedgecoxe and Robinson roads. He was off-duty when he was arrested by his colleagues. 

Details about how the department’s 2006 Rookie of the Year attempted to evade police were not available.

 

Look I understand this is probably not typical of the way the federal government or most officers act. The problem is there are enough examples of both types of bad behaviors for people to realize that the government can not always be counted on to get things right. Human beings are fallible; systems of governance made up of human beings are also.

If there is going to be the possibility of the government not getting it right; I simply want the government to be the back up regarding my safety and that of my family.

Please join the discussion.

R.I.P. – Elsmar’s Cove

For those who are in the same career field; you’ll recognize the name.
The Elsmar Cove Mission
To be a free Business Standards Compliance and Business Systems Information Resource to Quality Assurance, Engineering and Management Professionals.
People Helping People since 1996!
 
Sorry, folks. After over 19 years continuously online, starting out as QS9000.com, Elsmar.com is now permanently closed.

There’s nothing else I can say, other than that I am proud to know that over the last 19 years tens of thousands, probably more like hundreds of thousands, maybe even millions of people have been helped, for free, by some wonderful people who have voluntarily helped people with answers to their business standards and other questions over the years in the Elsmar Cove forum.

Hadn’t stopped in there in a while, I wish I had. There was a lot of useful information and great people in the forums. Many thanks to all who made it a success over the past 2 decades.

 

 

Unintended Consequences?

I’m always amazed at how people don’t seem to be able to think things through.

Los Angeles (CNN)In drought-punished Southern California, with the unceremonious push of a steely sodbuster, another lawn bites the dust.

That’s one down, and a sprawl to go.

Here in the land of perpetual sunshine, up to 5,000 residential lawns now vanish each month, converted into drought-resistant gardens and yards in under cash incentives, says the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD), a consortium of water utilities serving 17 million people.

It’s all part of“the nation’s largest turf removal and water conservation program”whose budget was more than quadrupled in May, to $450 million, because of a homeowner rush to save water, the district says.

Yeah, let’s put the focus on the homeowner’s rush to save water and not the MWD’s drive to save their business.  The article indicates that the program will “save more than 70 million gallons of water over 10 years — enough water for 160,000 households” — but are they considering the impact such actions will have?

Climate is controlled at ground level by turfgrasses as they cool temperatures appreciably, thus working as exterior “air conditioners.”  

Dust and smoke particles from the atmosphere are trapped by turf which helps keep the air cleaner.

Noise is absorbed by grass areas which cut down on excessive sound, a growing problem in urban areas.

For example, grassed slopes beside lowered expressways reduce noise 8-10 decibels.

Pollutants, such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide, are absorbed by turfgrasses thereby rendering the air fit to breathe. 

So instead of having CO2 sinks in our cities; we are going to increase the urban heat effect, increase the amount of pollution and dust in the area and increase the noise level. Gee, won’t it be such fun living in those areas?

 

 

Financial News – Greece

Global stock markets sank Monday after Greece closed its banks and imposed capital controls in a dramatic turn in its struggle with heavy debts.

Oil prices declined and the euro edged down after Athens announced the moves to stanch the flow of money out of Greek banks and pressure creditors to offer concessions before a bailout program expires Tuesday.

Germany’s DAX index tumbled 2.9 percent to 11,161.41 points in early trading and France’s CAC-40 dived 3.4 percent to 4,887.69. Britain’s FTSE 100 dropped 1.6 percent to 6,643.83. Futures augured losses on Wall Street. Dow futures were down 1.1 percent at 17,677.00. S&P 500 futures shed 1.1 percent to 2,073.00.

Greece’s Cabinet closed banks for six business days and restricted cash withdrawals. The Athens Stock Exchange was due to be closed Monday. That follows Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ weekend decision to call a referendum on European and International Monetary Fund proposals for Greek reforms in return for bailout funds.

The accelerating crisis has raised questions about whether Greece might withdraw from the 19-nation euro currency, a move dubbed Grexit.

While this has happened in the past; I strongly suggest people keep an eye out. Each time this happens the odds of the problem cascading to affect our economy increases.  As everyone knows our world economy is very tightly interwoven with so many other countries. Even if we don’t have much direct trade with Greece, other countries do so if their economy tanks it can impact ours.
Next, I would also suggest people study how the Greek government has and will handle this. One of the common steps as shown above is a ‘bank holiday’. Think about what would do how you handle business, how you would put food on the table and gas in your car. People still have to work, still have to get to doctor’s appointments, buy medicine etc.

Think about what else the government or banks can do. Remember in 2013?

He should know. As Cypriot finance minister in 2013, Sarris was forced into a deal contingent on winding down a bank on an ELA lifeline. A second bank was forced to raid its clients deposits to recapitalize, a process known as a ‘bail-in’.

How many of us keep most of our money in the banks; wouldn’t it be a kick to find out the bank decided to take 10, 15, 40% of your money to stay afloat?

I’m watching closely and trying to take the lessons to heart. What do you think about the situation?
Please join the discussion>?

Great Price

I don’t have any arrangements with Midway USA other then I’ve purchased products from them in the past. Got this notice in the inbox today and thought I would share.

Caldwell E-MAX Low Profile Electronic Earmuffs (NRR 23dB) Green
Caldwell E-MAX Low Profile Electronic Earmuffs (NRR 23dB) Green
$18.05
List Price $32.99
Sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s a pretty good price for the product. I’ve purchased a couple in the past and use them regularly

Really Mr. President?

“This type of mass violence does not happen in other advanced countries. It doesn’t happen in other places with this kind of frequency.”

— Barack Obama on Thursday, June 18th, 2015 in remarks at the White House

As usual the gun control advocates – aka Anti-Rights Cultists — will try to weasel out of it citing the ‘advanced’ countries specification. As if the people of a high GDP country are any more moral or ethical than anyone else.

In Tunisia, a gunman killed 37 people, mostly tourists, at a seaside resort. In Kuwait, an Islamic State suicide bomber killed at least 27 people at a Shiite mosque. In France, a driver rammed his truck into a U.S.-owned gas factory, where a decapitated body was found with the head hanging at the entrance. In all, at least 65 people were killed across the three continents.

I wonder how Tunisia and Kuwait feel about being left of of the “advanced” country status. Of course, France doesn’t qualify because – well only one person was killed there, right?

Of course even Politifact is having to spin unsuccessfully President Obama’s claim.

We compared mass shooting incidents across countries is to calculate the number of victims per capita — that is, adjusted for the country’s total population size.

Calculating it this way shows the United States in the upper half of the list of 11 countries, ranking higher than Australia, Canada, China, England, France, Germany and Mexico.

Still, the U.S. doesn’t rank No. 1. At 0.15 mass shooting fatalities per 100,000 people, the U.S. had a lower rate than Norway (1.3 per 100,000), Finland (0.34 per 100,000) and Switzerland (1.7 per 100,000).

We’ll note that all of these countries had one or two particularly big attacks and have relatively small populations, which have pushed up their per-capita rates. In Norway, that single attack in 2011 left 67 dead by gunfire (plus additional bomb casualties). Finland had two attacks, one that killed eight and one that killed 10. And Switzerland had one incident that killed 14.

Still, while the United States did rank in the top one-third of the list, the fact that three other countries exceeded the United States using this method of comparison does weaken Obama’s claim that “it doesn’t happen in other places with this kind of frequency.” In at least three countries, the data shows, it does.

Elsass warned PolitiFact of a few caveats about the data. While they believe their database “to be among the most exhaustive compilations available,” Elsass noted that it may not include every instance of mass shootings. It also doesn’t include every example of mass killings — just those committed by firearms, even though mass stabbings are not uncommon in such places as China. Finally, their database doesn’t include acts generally considered to be terrorism, such as the attack in Paris on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

“If these were included, we are likely to see something much different statistically as there have been a number of very high-profile terrorist attacks in Europe, some including the use of firearms, that are excluded from the current analysis,” she said. But in all likelihood, this would only make the case against Obama’s claim stronger.

Emphasis mine – I don’t mind talking about the issues. I don’t mind admitting that America, for whatever reasons, is more homicidal then many other countries. But let’s be honest in our debate.

Please join the discussion.